How Executive Reputation Management Builds the Company and Your Personal Brand

If you are a chief executive in your company, managing your online reputation is just as good for your company as it is for your own image. That’s because as a visible leader in the business, your reputation and ideas support and reflect the company’s online profile in addition to building your personal brand explains Shravan Gupta Director of Emaar MGF. There are 4 main ways executive reputation management can help build the company’s good reputation. They’re even more important–and effective–if you’re starting a small business or creating a startup. If you need any Business articles you should visit to cofe winchester website.

Hire Better Talent

Good executive and company reputations work together to help you hire more skilled employees. Both company and executive reputations attract prospective employees by giving them a good indication of:

  • the workplace environment

  • business values, mission, and culture

  • recognized and rewarded behaviors

More importantly, if executives have reputations as industry experts and thought leaders, the business naturally attracts the best employees. They are dedicated to the industry, tend to have more talent, are diligent and hard working, and want to learn from the big names in their field. For best blogs related to online business then check this out.

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Whether you sell a product or service, strong executive reputations help the company generate more leads and sales, indirectly also benefitting the employees reputation in the company’s time tracker software. When executives are known for expertise, leadership, and quality, those attributes build and support the reputation of the company overall. With those virtues, the company’s offerings and customer support are more likely to be top-notch, which attracts more customers and clients. You can improve your software development skill by visiting us.

Strong executive and company reputations can also help you

  • justify charging more for your products and services

  • negotiate better mergers and acquisitions

  • resolve employee or customer problems more smoothly

Attract Better Customers and Investors

On top of getting more leads, sales, and revenue, positive executive reputations help the company attract a higher caliber of customers and investors. With strong executive reputation management, business leaders can effectively share the best qualities of their personal reputations with the company reputation, attracting customers and investors who value those qualities. Some of the best personal qualities that attract better customers and investors include:

  • industry expertise

  • high-quality products

  • efficient and fair governance

  • social responsibility policies

  • supporting charities or important causes

And better customers and investors mean more funding and more revenue to grow the business.

Get Better Media Coverage

People connect with other people, not businesses. So an executive’s reputation is ultimately more important in getting media coverage, while more good press builds up both the company profile and the executive’s personal brand. Executives who maintain a positive online reputation attract more reporters and better news stories, and have an easier time getting their press releases and news published.

Executives who become thought leaders take it one step further by increasing the visibility of the company. By regularly publishing expert content with the business name as part of their byline, these executives build the exposure and expertise of their company and their own brand at the same time.

4 Reputation Management Tips for Millennials

The US population ebbs and flows just like the ocean. After WWII there was the baby boom, when the US saw the highest birth rate it had seen since it’s founding. Since then we’ve seen Generation X and the Millenials (Generation Y). The Baby Boomers are getting older now, and they are settling down, retiring, and becoming empty nesters. The Gen Xers are in their mid 30s to late 40s—in the middle of their careers—but the Millenials are just getting started. And growing up in the internet age, surrounded by technology and endless accessibility to data, has given them a different perspective on information sharing and personal reputation not shared by older generations.

Boomers aren’t interested in learning new technologies unless it helps them talk to their children and grand children. And Gen Xers are pretty tech savvy, but they understand that technology is simply a tool and a proxy for interpersonal relationships. Millennials, on the other hand, have grown up sharing all types of personal information online through social networks, blogs, and more.

Where Boomers aren’t concerned about online reputation, and Gen Xers are aware of how damaging it can be. Most Millennials have yet to face the consequences of bad reputation management. And for a generation that has shared so much online, that’s a problem.

However as they leave college and enter the workforce, the problems of sharing anything and everything online will start to become apparent. Not only are prospective employers cruising social networks to check out job applicants but being easily found online is quickly becoming a mark of prestige. As a result, negative and embarrassing online content is a bigger liability now than it has ever been in the history of our culture, and a lack of being easily found can be a sign of lack of experience and engagement.

So it is now the tricky job of Millennials to walk a fine line between sharing too much information and sharing just enough content online to build a positive reputation. Millennials have to be vigilant reputation managers of their identity like no other generation has been. But they can get things straight and cultivate a positive online reputation if they start early and follow a few basic principles.

1) Be mindful

First and foremost, Millennials need to be aware that what they do and say online matters. In high school it’s easy to think, “I can do and say what I want, no one cares.” But you have to keep in mind that the thing you didn’t think was important four years ago is still there, and people you want to impress can find it easier than you think. So the first step in cultivating a positive personal reputation management strategy is to only post positive content to social networks and blogs. Don’t post embarrassing information or (heaven forbid) brag about doing something illegal or unethical.

2) Get a head start

Because most Millennials are not concerned about these things, those that recognize the importance of reputation management have a fantastic opportunity in front of them. Grab up as many personalized online properties as you can while you’re young. And hang onto them. For example, personalized social profiles, name specific domains, and more. You may not need to use them now, but one day they will come in handy. And you want to grab them before someone else does.

3) Create

One of the best things you can do to cultivate a positive online reputation is to create content. That is, start a blog, curate content through your social networks, and become an influencer online. Even though you may still be young, start building a professional profile now. Colleges and future employers will be impressed with the work you’ve done so early in life, and you’ll be a shoo-in compared with applicants who aren’t aware of their online reputation at all.

4) Take care

As you look toward the future, think about reputation management as you go about your digital life. Look toward the future with a goal of being easily found online (for positive reasons) and work toward it. If you don’t take control of your online reputation, then your carelessness will. Stay on top of new technology and new platforms as they arise so you can always be ahead of the reputation management game.

7 Tips for Reputation Management With Twitter

Just a couple of years ago, many companies balked at the idea that Twitter could be useful for their business—“It’s just a bunch of people talking about what they ate for breakfast, right?” Today, social media marketing is the mainstream, and those who aren’t doing it are missing the train to better customer relationships and higher conversion rates.

But Twitter isn’t just about telling customers that you’re having a sale this Friday or informing them about your latest press release. Twitter is also a great tool for reputation management. Because Twitter allows you to deal directly with the public on a near-realtime basis. and it allows you to monitor all public tweets, it can be a great place to listen to the chatter surrounding your brand, address potential problems, and build positive relationships online.

For starters, here are some great ways you can use Twitter as part of your reputation management strategy and reap the benefits of increased positive sentiment about your brand.

1) Monitor

Twitter is like a giant fire hose of consumer information. People tweet about all kinds of products and services. They tweet about the latest Sony TV they bought or the dress they just got at a steal from a Nordstrom’s sale. If you have any sizable customer base, and that base is fairly tech savvy, chances are that you are being mentioned on Twitter—and you may not even know it. Once you create an account, you can set up a keywords search for mentions of your company and product names. When you see users talking about you you’ll begin to understand how Twitter can be a useful reputation management tool.

2) Identify issues

One of the great weaknesses of Twitter is that people use it to complain about the products and services in their lives. But that also means that, as a reputation management specialist, you can use those complaints to your advantage. If many customers are complain about a new feature you just added to one of your products, you might reconsider that feature. If they’re having trouble loading your website, it’s time to walk down to IT and see what the problem might be.

3) Give thanks

You can also build positive sentiment on Twitter by thanking people who compliment your business and products. Just shoot them a quick “thanks for your kind words.” They’ll be impressed that you’re paying attention and feel personally closer to the brand. You just made a life-long customer.

4) Respond to problems

You’ll gain some great business insights if you monitor Twitter for complaints, but you’ll gain more customers if you actually respond to those complaints. If someone Tweets in frustration about one of your products, send a tweet and ask them how you can help. Point them toward resources and offer to fix the issue yourself. When you can do that, you’ll have changed that customer’s mind about your company and product.

5) Be a resource

Once customers understand that you are online and want to interact with them, you can become a great resource by fielding questions about your products and services. Give your audience the resources to solve their problems and give them tips and tricks to have a better experience with your product. They’ll thank you and recommend you to their friends.

6) Listen

This is similar to “monitor”; however, listening is like monitoring with your heart. Be open and welcoming to your customers. Don’t shrug them off when they ask what you think is a stupid question, but rather encourage them to talk about their problems and issues with you. Be sympathetic and give your brand a human ear.

7) Offer suggestions

When you notice a customer struggling, offer to help before they even ask. Your company has a lot of expertise and knowledge. Offering to help with their issues will go a long way to building trust with the customer and help them form a positive reputation of your company.

Keys to Avoid Over-optimizing Your Reputation Management Strategy

You’ve seen the original Disney cartoon, the Sorcerer’s Apprentice, right? In it, Mickey is the apprentice to a powerful sorcerer, but he longs to do magic on his own. So when the sorcerer leaves their cave dwelling, and orders Mickey to clean up the place, Mickey decides to try a little magic himself. He enchants a broom to clean up and fill the cistern full of water, while he goes and takes a nap.

When he wakes up, the broom is doing such a good job at filling the cistern that the cave is flooding. He tries to stop it, but when he fails, he chops the broom into bits. But instead of stopping the broom, all the slivers of the broom grow into brooms themselves and continue the job they had been enchanted to do, filling the cave with water, nearly drowning Mickey in the process.

Likewise, a reputation management strategy can take on a life of its own if we’re not careful with it. And it can do such a good job that it actually starts to harm the site we were trying to get ranked. Sometimes, when Google and the other search engines look at the optimized juggernaut we have created, they see our enchanted brooms and may suppress our rank and even de-index our sites (in extreme cases).

So in order to avoid these penalties, there are a few things we need to keep in mind so that the optimizing we are doing in the name of reputation management doesn’t get out of hand and end up hurting us.

1) Diversify anchor text

In online reputation management, we have the inclination to ensure that all the links we build to the sites and content we want to rank are branded terms—our company name, product name, and other company-specific terms. In a natural link profile, any given site will have a high number of branded anchor texts linking to it. But there will also be a lot of “link noise.” Link noise is the term for anchor text that doesn’t have any specific relation to the site it links to. For example, phrases like “click here,” “this link,” or “source” are common link noise. So make sure that you diversity your anchor text so that it appears to be natural to search engines, and you’ll avoid any trouble.

2) Forget about keyword density

The search engines have gotten pretty good at detecting when certain websites are keyword-stuffing in order to rank better. Although, in the past, reputation management managers have tried to put their branded term in the website text at a 2-4% density (2-4 keywords for every100 words on the site), today it’s better to simply use text that sounds like a normal person wrote it—and not a search engine optimizer.

It’s still important to use your company name and other branded terms in the text, just don’t overdo it. If your text starts to sound like it was written for search engines and not real people, back off a bit, and let your prose flow more naturally.

The Sorcerer Returns

When Mickey finally realizes he is in over his head (literally) and begins to drown, the sorcerer returns, dries up all the water, and puts Mickey back to work cleaning up the even bigger mess he has created. What we’re trying to avoid, as online reputation managers, is making a big mess in the first place. If we can stick to natural link building practices and not let our efforts get away from us—in the end—we won’t have to clean up an even bigger mess after the search engines come back and see what we’ve done.

Reputation Management as a Spork: 3 Questions to Ask to Improve Your Online Strategy

Reputation management is a spork. Just like a spork is a hybrid between a spoon and a fork, reputation management is like a hybrid between SEO and marketing. On the one hand, reputation management is about optimizing the right content so that it will rank well for your company-branded search results. At the same time, it’s about targeting the right type of people with the right kind of content so that they will form a very specific opinion about your company in only a few seconds.

It’s the marketing side of reputation management that often gets lost in the shuffle of creating a really great results page for your company. It’s easy to implement a series of strategies that build links to positive content for your company, but it’s a little more difficult trying to ascertain who exactly is searching for your company and define the best content to give them.

When it comes down to it, as a reputation management professional, you need to ask yourself 3 questions:

  1. Who is searching for my company online?
  2. What are they looking for?
  3. How can I give it to them?

Who Is Searching For My Company Online?

Before you can figure out the type of content to fill a branded search results page with, you need to know who you are targeting. When you know the average age, income level, social status, and other information about your customers, you’ll be able to better understand the type of content they need in order to make a positive judgment about your company. Virtual Private Server Hosting stands out as the only option for affordable and reliable dedicated hosting services. Indeed it is the best combination of a shared and dedicated server that won many hearts with brilliant performances in SEO Hosting. Webmasters are very keen to achieve success in this arena of neck to neck competition, but sometimes financial restrictions make them step back and opt for not so competing plans. Virtual hosting Services is a huge relief for all of them. It offers dedicated server hosting services, at a far lower cost than the dedicated servers do. Click here to find the details about Top Rated Server Hosting. Dedicated Servers Hosting is when you get to use a single server exclusively and you don’t have to share the server with anyone else. It makes you the controlling person and you can choose to tailor your server as per your requirement and according to the needs of your domain. Though Dedicated Servers are on the expensive side, you get multiple features and options that are worth paying for. Basically, if your website is visited by a lot of people within a very short period of time, Dedicate Server is the correct choice for you.

WordPress hosting services have been in high demand in recent years due to the growing popularity of WordPress as a blogging application. WordPress is used by countless bloggers for their self-hosted blogs as well as people running static sites. Its ease of use and features makes it one of the most popular applications on the web.

Some host providers are specifically advertising its easy integration with WordPress. 1-click installation and easy upgrades for WordPress are being offered by almost all web host providers. If you are planning to use WordPress to set up a self-hosted blog or as a content management system, you can consult with Knownhost managed wordpress hosting service they will offers user-friendly WordPress integration.

Which web host provider offers the best WordPress hosting?

There are two main requirements that a hosting service must meet in order to run WordPress. The provider must run on PHP 4.3 or higher and also MySQL 4.0 or higher. As long as these two requirements are met, WordPress can be installed with that hosting service. The only other difference among these web host providers is how easily they allow their users to install and upgrade WordPress.

1-click installation is the way to go and is provided by many popular control panels. If a web host does not have this feature but still meets the two requirements, it means that installation has to be done manually. Manual installation is not difficult, it just takes a little longer to complete. Remember to do the necessary research before deciding on a web host.

If you’ve recently started looking at various web hosting services, the chances are you’ve already come across what’s known as dedicated server hosting, and if that’s the case, you might be wondering if it’s a good choice. Your first priority at this point is to understand exactly what this type of service entails. In a nutshell, a dedicated web hosting service means that your website will be hosted on a server belonging only to you. In contrast, the majority of websites are hosted on shared servers. Each type has its own advantages and disadvantages.

The most obvious advantage of shared hosting is the drastically reduced costs, but for many businesses, there are more important aspects which need to be taken into consideration. For example, dedicated server hosting is in a totally different league in terms of performance; memory; storage, and so much more. Many larger websites in particular find that shared web hosting services are simply not ideal.

How does one actually go about determining whether or not dedicated server hosting is the best choice? Here are a few basic examples situations where such a solution would almost certainly be the best choice:

1. The nature of your new website dictates that you, as the website owner, will need to have a great deal of control over the server and its performance right from the start.

2. You are already using a shared server, but feel that you need additional features such increased RAM and etc.

 

What Are They Looking For?

Once you know who is searching for your company online—generally, the customer base your are targeting with your products and services—you’ll be able to better assess what kinds of question they are asking and what they want to know about your company. It’s also extremely helpful to look at the search traffic that is leading to your site. What are the keywords people are using to find your website? And what are the most heavily visited pages on your site? Local CLient Takeover training offers trusted methods for improving your search rankings and your local client base.

For example, if you sell children’s toys, your customer base consists of mothers in their mid 30s, and you find that one of the most heavily trafficked pages on your website is the page describing manufacturers, it stands to reason that people searching for your company online may be concerned about where your toys are made. Do a little more digging and may find that there is a large contingent of mothers who may be concerned about the plastics and paints used by your manufactures—either for health or environmental reasons.

Of course, not all questions may this cut and dried. But when you know who your customers are and what they are searching for, you’ll know what kind of information to give them in order to keep them on the first page of the search results

How Can You Give It to Them?

When you know what they’re searching for, give it to them. And give it to them quickly. In the example above, you’ll want to quickly reassure customers that your products are safe for their kids and for the environment. If they have to click through 3 pages on your website before finding that information, chances are that many of your potential customers have already clicked away from your site and are searching elsewhere.

Instead of burying that information deep in your website, create a subdomain on your website (that will appear as a separate search result) that speaks specifically to that question, reassuring customers that your products are safe. Or you could go a step further and create a microsite that addresses that question and then points customers to your website for more information.

The quicker you can give your potential customers what they are looking for with a branded search term, the more likely they are to trust you, and the less likely they are to look for that information elsewhere.

Control Your Message

One of the most important aspects of reputation management is to control your own message so others don’t do it for you. When you know what your customers are searching for, and can fill that need for them, you control the perception of your company as well as the search results they see. And that’s when you’ll truly have a grasp on your reputation management strategy.

A Quick Guide to Online Reputation for Parents

Although we were all kids once, today’s parents may have an even harder time understanding their children than nearly any generation in the history of the world. Never before has technology moved so fast, and never before has the world changed so much in the span of only a couple decades. It’s a fact that kids today are growing up in a world that is extremely different than the world their parents grew up in. In fact, if you are the parent of a teenager today, chances are you didn’t even know what the internet was until you were well out of high school.

This is part of the reason teenagers get into so much trouble online—their parents never had to deal with this technology and many of them still don’t know how to use it as well as their kids. Besides the obvious dangers of strangers, piracy, and pornography online, teenagers today also have an increased chance of ruining their future online reputation due to things they post online today.

It’s not something we talk about very often, but parents need to help guide their children toward safe and positive online interactions now, so that their online behavior won’t come back to haunt them in the future. Primarily parents need to work with their kids to learn, monitor, and teach.

Learn

Because most parents of teenagers today didn’t have widespread access to the internet when they were young, it can sometimes be hard to identify with the tech-savvy youth of today. But just because you’re not a digital native doesn’t mean you can’t learn to communicate like one

Primarily, parents need to be aware of the technology that exists, what it is capable of, and how to use it. If you are not already on Facebook—join. And join other sites that your kids are using as well. The best way to learn about these technologies is to use them yourself. As well, stay abreast of the latest trends in online web culture. When you hear about a popular new site, check it out for yourself. It’ll make it easier to talk to your kids about it and help them understand how to use it responsibly.

Monitor

Knowing about these sites and using them isn’t of much use unless you know what your kids are doing on them. It’s a good idea to follow your kids online, and make it a requirement that they let you follow them as a condition of joining. You don’t have to monitor every conversation they have or every link they post, but you need to be able to check in every once in a while to make sure they’re not posting inappropriate photos or posting comments that could be harmful to them down the road.

A growing number of employers check out potential employees on social networks before they hire them and many college admission officers are beginning to do the same. Already at this young age, teens need to be aware of their online reputation and the real-world impact it can have on them. And you can help them develop an awareness of their online reputation while they are young, so they will develop positive habits they can carry into adulthood.

Teach

Once you know how to use social networks and follow your kids’ online activities, you need to help guide them to make good decisions. Although the internet appears to be a vast playground where you can do anything you want without consequence, that is hardly the case. Teach your kids to be mindful of their online reputation today, and they won’t run into problems later. For example, teach them:

  • Not to post inappropriate photos of themselves online—photos where they appear partially clothed or participating in dangerous or illegal behavior.
  • To treat others with respect online.
  • To keep their blog posts clean and professional.

Learn Together

Teaching your kids about online reputation hazards early is about opening a dialogue and having an open and frank discussion about what is and is not appropriate online etiquette. When the two of you can sit down and understand the pitfalls of irresponsible online behavior, you’ll be helping your teens shore themselves against future embarrassment and negative consequences.

4 Principles for Clearly Defining Your Reputation Management Goals

It’s been said that you can define the difference between management and leadership with a mountain climbing expedition. The leader will sit the group down and talk about getting to the top of the mountain, how glorious it will be, and how we all have to work together to get there.

On the other hand, the manager will coordinate the ropes, carabineers, and make sure everyone is wearing the right equipment for the trip.

Both these jobs are essential for making it to the top of the mountain successfully, but sometimes, in our reputation management strategy planning, we might be too much of one or the other—focusing too much on what we want to achieve, without much detail as to how we’re going to do it, or focusing so much on the details that the overall goal is never reached.

For that reason, it is important to define your goals clearly before creating your reputation management strategy, so everyone is on the same page and all your efforts are focused toward singular goals. That way, you don’t lose sight of what you want to achieve and how you want to achieve it.

If you want your reputation management strategy to succeed, here are four things to keep in mind when setting goals.

1) Keep it Simple

Create a defining statement that clearly summarizes our goals. But don’t make it too complex or include multiple sub points. A great goal statement is simple, direct, and easy to understand. In fact, if it takes you more than one sentence to define your reputation management goal, you probably ought to try again.

For example, “To gain a majority link position in the SERPs though a variety of optimization and linkbuilding activities, including social profiles and business listings, focusing on positive outcomes, to be achieved in the first quarter of 2012,” is not the way to go.

Something better might be: “To achieve 7 of the top 10 results for our branded search term in the next 6 months.” It’s direct, easy to understand, and there is no ambiguity about the goal that needs to be reached.

2) Concrete

In the previous example, the second goal is also more concrete. It focuses on a specific number of results that need to be achieved and sets a specific time frame for when the goal should be achieved. All your reputation management goals should have a concreteness to them that makes them tangible and real. Without a grounding in reality that focuses on specific numbers, timeframes, and outcomes, you run the danger of getting lost, losing sight of your goal, and failing altogether.

 3) Achievable

It can be extremely tempting to set goals that sound great on paper but won’t work in the real world. For example, attempting to get 20 positive articles about your company to rank for a branded search term in 30 days might sound ideal, but it’s probably not achievable.

Although 20 positive links in the SERPs isn’t a bad overall goal, 30 days might be a little quick. And when you don’t achieve it, it can be depressing and disheartening—especially if you worked hard to achieve it. Set smaller goals that you can achieve on your way to your bigger goal. You’ll feel good about your small achievements, and they’ll all build to a bigger goal with a more reasonable time frame.

4) Measurable

Lastly, make sure you set goals that you can measure. If you don’t set measurable goals, you’ll never know if you achieved them or not. For example a goal like, “To improve our company’s online reputation.” Is a commendable, but how do you know when you’ve “improved” your company’s online reputation, when the first 5 results are positive? The first 10? 15? And when are you supposed to complete this goal?

Rather, set goals that you can measure and have deadlines. That way you can stay focused. And when you achieve your goal, you’ll know you’ve accomplished something, and you can move on to the next big milestone.

Any Road Will Take You There

The Cheshire Cat once told Alice, “If you don’t know where you’re going, any road will take you there.” With a lack of simple, concrete, achievable, and measure goals for your reputation management strategy, you’ll end up wandering down dark paths and dead-end roads instead of glorying in an improved online reputation.

So, as you sit down to create your reputation management strategy, take a look at your goals and see if you know where you’re going before you leave the path and start heading up the mountain.

Other Reputation Management posts:

How to Ruin Your Online Reputation in 7 Easy Steps

If you haven’t been living in cave for the past 10 years, you know that the internet is now the dominant form of communication on the planet, and that the data on the internet is vast and all encompassing. So encompassing, in fact, that if you’ve ever posted an article online, created a social profile or interacted with anyone on the internet while using your own name, it can be found.

If you’re careful with your online reputation, this shouldn’t be a problem. In fact, many people now use the web as a great way to promote themselves, so they have a large online presence and can easily be found when anyone Google’s their name. But what about your online reputation? What happens when you search for your name online? Is it something positive about you, or is it someone else who shares your name dominating the results? Does it show you professional profiles and links to quality content that you have created, or does it bring up pictures of you from a frat party 10 years ago?

But maybe you’re the type who doesn’t want to create a positive online reputation for themselves. Maybe you want people who search for your name online to find those embarrassing pictures of you. If you don’t care about your online reputation, here is a surefire way to ensure that no one will want to hire you, work with you, or be your friend after they search for you online.

1) Don’t Google yourself

If want to ruin your online reputation, never try and find out what it is in the first place. That is, don’t search for yourself online, and certainly don’t use web monitoring tools like Google alerts to find out when someone mentions your name online. Because if you find out that someone has mentioned you online in an unflattering way, you might feel obligated to contact them and try and correct them. And that would be horrible for the bad reputation you are trying to cultivate.

2) Don’t claim your social profiles

Smart web users recognize the value in claiming profiles that correspond to their name on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and others. But if you want to ruin your reputation don’t claim any of those. Let other people claim them and then sit back and watch them create embarrassing and unflattering content in your name. Remember, if you don’t control reputation, someone else will. But maybe that’s what you want.

3) Post compromising pictures of yourself on the web

There are losts of great ways to ruin your reputation online, but compromising pictures of yourself is a really great way to prove to everyone what an irresponsible jerk you are. Drunk photos, partially clothed photos, photos of you committing illegal acts—these are all great ways to show potential employers or college admissions boards that you are not the kind of person they want associated with their name.

4) Be extremely opinionated, eschewing any sense of responsibility

The best way to show people that you are shallow and hard to work with is by posting blog rants about all of your biggest pet peeves and dirtiest habits as well as complaining about your co-workers and supervisors. And then don’t offer any solutions, back up your claims, or exude any hint of responsibility or intelligence toward your subject. That is a sure path to online reputation failure.

5) Make a spectacle of yourself

If you really want to make sure your online reputation is completely ruined. Make a spectacle of yourself in public, preferably doing something unsavory, and make sure the police are involved. That’s a great way to get yourself defamed in a news article or have your mug shot posted on the web for anyone to see. Celebrities do it all the time, so it’ll probably work for you too.

6) Attract a lot of attention for your online activities

The best way to make sure your infamous activities and blog posts get the to the top of a Google search—so they can do the maximum amount of damage—is to make sure you garner a lot of attention. The more links and social shares for your online content, the higher your unsavory acts will appear in the search engine results.

7) Don’t hire a reputation management company

If you want to completely ruin your online reputation, this is the absolute worst thing you can do. A reputation management company will only want to clean up your search results, make sure all that “offensive” content is taken down and de-indexed, and prod you to act responsibly online. They’re very good at what they do, and they can be very persuasive. But at all costs resist asking them for help because, in no time, you’ll see your online reputation improve and people will want to hire you and be your friend. And that’s exactly the kind of thing you’re trying to avoid.

Tips for Using PPC as a Reputation Management Strategy

Most people in the world are completely unaware of how search engines work and how it’s possible to use search algorithms to manipulate the results you see on the page. As a result, many SEOs and reputation management professionals are thought of as magicians who use dark sorcery to “trick” Google into doing their bidding. But nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, many people are flummoxed as to how Google makes any money. They don’t sell anything, right?

Well, those in the industry know that besides a handful of premium services, Google makes the vast majority of its money selling advertising. And you can use Google’s ad system to help your online reputation, just like you can use any other tactic to mold a results page that is optimal for the reputation of your company.

PPC (or pay-per-click) advertising are the ads that run at the top and sides of a Google search page. They don’t take up a spot in the results, but they do push the “natural” results lower on the page, taking up screen real estate. And many users can’t tell the difference between the paid and non-paid results on a serach—which is one of the reasons these ads work so well.

Google sells these ads on an auction basis. In other words, whoever is willing to pay the most for the ad space gets the best spot on the page. In terms of reputation management, it’s not likely that many other companies will be bidding for space on a search for your company name (however in some industries this is the case), so your PPC rates should be fairly small. Perhaps as little as a few cents per click.

If you feel that it might be worth it to buy ads on a search for your company name and take up some extra page real estate, here are a few tips you’ll need to keep in mind to save money on your campaign:

1) Use the ad scheduler to limit your ads to peak search hours

When you buy ads from Google, you have the opportunity to use the ad scheduler to specify the times of the day you want your ads to run. Running your ads 24 hours a day is a good way to catch everyone who searches for your company names, but it could cost you a lot of money. Instead, use your Google analytics tools to find out what days of the week and what times of the day are most ideal for capturing the maximum amount of people with your ad. Then schedule your ad to run during those times, saving you money and giving you the most benefit at the same time.

2) Use “standard” delivery method

On the other hand, if you are on a budget and can only devote a small amount of money to PPC, you may opt to limit placement of your ads to the amount you can pay each day. If this is the case, you’ll be offered two options when buying ads: standard delivery or accelerated delivery.

With standard, your ads will be evenly spaced out through the day. With accelerated delivery, your ad will run on every search possible until you run out of budget. In some cases this means that your ad will appear in searches for your company name only in the morning—leaving the afternoon wide open.

Although some PPC marketers advocate for accelerated delivery, with reputation management, you’ll want to opt for standard so you can save the most money and still get exposure throughout the day.

PPC and Reputation Management

Granted, PPC is not usually the first option for a reputation management strategy because searches for your specific company name are generally low-competition keywords. But if you’ve had trouble with certain results showing up near the top of a search, or if your competitors are buying ads for branded searches, then PPC is an option you might consider. And these basics will get you started down the right path to a stronger reputation management strategy.

Stop Banging Your Head Against the Wall: 4 Reasons to Change Your Reputation Management Strategy

Why would you want to bang your head against a wall? It hurts, it wastes time, and it looks pretty silly to boot. But many companies are metaphorically banging their heads against a wall with their reputation management strategy. Although the search world keeps changing, these companies still employ the same tactics they always have in an attempt to mold a great search engine results page and solidify their online reputation with continually diminishing returns.

Albert Eisntein once said, “The definition of stupidity is doing same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” So why are these companies using the same reputation strategy they’ve used for the past 2-4 years? Mostly because they don’t know they need to change, or they simply don’t want to put the effort into creating a new strategy.

Well, if you aren’t changing your reputation management strategy to reflect the current trends in search, get ready for some headaches. On the other hand, if you’d like to try something different, here are some reasons to update your reputation management strategy.

1) The Google Crackdown

Ever since the Panda update early last year, Google has been going after content farms and link spam much more aggressively. And they’ll continue to do so in the coming year. Not only are their algorithms getting more complex and harder to “game,” but Google is handing out warnings and penalizing sites that don’t more strictly adhere to their policies and guidelines for quality sites. If your reputation management strategy has employed questionable tactics in the past, now is the time to change up your strategy to avoid penalties that could leave you open to attack.

2) The Growth of Social

Just a couple years ago, it was still okay for a company to ignore the social web. Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and others were still considered toys that kids played with. But that is no longer true. In fact, the fastest growing demographic for Facebook is the 55+ crowd. Today, social needs to be a part of any marketing strategy and is essential to your reputation management strategy. Social profiles are easy to create and they take up space in the results, giving you a stronger reputation management profile.

Plus, Google is increasingly relying on social signals to determine page rank. If you’re not using social at this point, it’s time to change your ways.

3) The Rise of Mobile

Many experts in the industry agree that 2012 will be the year of mobile. A larger portion of the population is using smart phones and other wireless devices to access the internet. This means that a larger portion of users are taking advantage of mobile devices to search for your company name as well as upload and create reviews and other content on the fly. And it is entirely possible that Google will begin optimizing results for content that is mobile friendly. So you need to be more vigilant about online reviews affecting your brand-targeted searches, and you need to get on the bandwagon with mobile.

4) The World is Changing

There is a reason you don’t see beeper stores anymore. Technology has moved on and the culture with it. As the access to technology and communication becomes easier and more affordable, the channels people use to access information about your company will grow, and you need to grow with it. Look for trends and be ready to adapt to those trends, or your online reputation may suffer.

Stop the Headaches

History has proven that companies and individuals who were unwilling to change and try new strategies and new technologies have dried up and failed (remember MySpace?). It’s a new year; a time for renewal and change. Take this opportunity to update your reputation management strategy and stop banging your head against a wall.

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