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Online Reputation Management Archives - Big Blue Robot - Online Reputation Management

BrandMentions – a great tool for Brand Monitoring and Competitive Analysis

Tracking your business and brands on the web can be challenging. To review your online presence you need to be able to see who’s talking about you in social media, and how many instances of your brand are being mentioned and shared. Brand monitoring is the latest trend in digital marketing. It is the process that collects all that information. You are able to review multiple social media channels and basically any instance of people mentioning your business. BrandMentions is a great tool to monitor your entire online presence and even that of your competition.

BrandMentions is a brand monitoring tool designed to track any keywords you want and engage in online conversations in real-time. The tool helps you measure the brand authority and manage the reputation of any business designed for marketers, business owners, public figures, and influencers.

It has a variety of features available to make it easier to spot trends, discover insights, gain a competitive advantage and give you a head start when managing crisis situations. You can search for whatever topic you’d like to explore and see how it’s trending.

Moreover, it works great for checking on your competitors, managing your brand reputation, media & brand monitoring, content marketing and much more.

The sentiment analysis feature allows you to understand what do people think about your brand. It shows positive or negative sentiment based on the tone of voice and many other factors for each individual mention. Knowing all of that will help you manage your brand reputation better.

Tracking mentions is vital to your brand reputation and it can be easier to get honest feedback about your business. BrandMentions make the process run naturally and intuitively. For each keyword tracked (brand, topic, competitor and more), you get a list of accurate and relevant mentions. If you’d like to learn more about the advantage this marketing service has to offer check out BrandMentions.

Amazon Reviews

Are Amazon’s star ratings now completely worthless?

Have you ever read through reviews of an item on Amazon and realized they were for different versions of the product, or for completely different products? And yet, the reviews were all combined to form one overall star rating.

A recent study by The Guardian found that such “bundled” reviews can make shoddy products seem like they’ve earned stellar ratings.

How then can we easily judge the reputation and quality of a company’s product if Amazon is combining star ratings for completely different items? I mean, if I want a Kindle version of a book, I don’t care about people complaining that a print version had pages missing. Apples and oranges, folks.

So is it best to ignore the overall star rating, and just plow through as many reviews as you can read? Or is there really some relevant signal in all the noise?

The Weeds of Reputation Management

How is a business like an unruly garden? Sounds like a riddle, but maybe doing yard work is an apt metaphor for running a business.

Every time you turn around there’s another weed growing, or grass that needs trimming, or something wilting. Not to mention aphids, gophers, and other joys of nature.

It takes frequent attention to keep the whole thing from becoming a jungle of weeds… or turning into a dustbowl.

Online reputation works a lot like this. Neglect it for even a short while, and soon the “weeds” of negative pages start to pop up in your Google search results.

That’s when you know there’s more work to be done.

What about your business? What are some signs that you’ve neglected one area or another, and what’s your best tip for keeping on top of things?

Online Reputation Management for Business

Here’s something that comes up in executive meetings all the time: “Why are people saying bad things about us on the Internet, and what can we do about it?”

This can be especially troubling to the CEO who founded the company and who has spent long years working hard to build the brand. He wakes up one day and finds defamatory remarks online about his company—not constructive criticism, but outrageous accusations and almost slanderous comments.

Worse, the negative reviews are on websites that rank high on search engine results pages, so that anyone doing a search on the company will see them. And it’s not just one negative review website, but several, causing the company’s online reputation to suffer.

As an executive, you need to be aware of your online reputation and know that you can take steps to manage it. You shouldn’t just leave it up to fate, or simply hope that people won’t post negative comments about your company. Your online reputation can have a dramatic effect on not only your brand perception, but also your company’s revenues.

A couple of years ago I met with a company that had a severe online reputation problem. When potential customers searched their company name, seven out of the top 10 Google rankings were negative. After a careful review of their rankings, and prior-year revenues, I determined that they were probably losing more than $1.5 million a year in sales due to negative search engine results. The company confirmed the fact that my estimates were indeed accurate—but low.

All companies face a unique challenge in protecting their online reputation. And because your success or failure depends on how potential customers perceive you, I want to cover the basics of managing and improving your online reputation.

1) What we mean by “online reputation”

Your online reputation is determined by the top Google rankings a prospect sees when they do a search on your company name. A prospect can quickly glance down the page of results and look for anything of interest that pops out at them. If a lot of those websites have negative reviews and complaints about your company, it will automatically diminish your reputation in their eyes. But if they see a list of websites with positive comments and testimonials, they’re more likely to sign up without further hesitation.

Because most people rarely look past the first page or two of search engine results, your online reputation is determined by the top 10 or 20 search results.

2) Where negative postings come from

Some websites specialize in letting anyone post a complaint. That makes it extremely easy for a dissatisfied customer to go online and share his or her experience with the world. And the complaint will still appear years later, even if it was a customer service issue that was quickly handled.

Websites like scam.com, ripoffreport.com and complaintsboard.com will pretty much accept postings from anyone. However, they rarely check for accuracy and are not likely to remove a posting if you request it.

These websites also tend to rank high in the search engines, so if your company is named in a complaint on one of these websites, expect it to show up on a search about you.

3) How a few complaints can hurt your online reputation

You might think that if you have thousands of happy customers and distributors, a few online complaints shouldn’t matter. But the math doesn’t work out that way.

Consider that a Google search returns 10 results on the first page. If just three of those are websites with complaints or criticisms, it means nearly a third of the search results are for negative websites. They may still be in the minority, but when a curious prospect sees a link that promises to reveal the “dirt” on a company, it’s hard to resist clicking through. After all, isn’t that what you’d do?

Even one review on a website like scam.com can have an impact if it shows up near the top of the page. Sometimes a single complaint, valid or not, is enough to scare away a prospect.

I know this sounds dire, but basic human psychology is at work here. All it takes is one negative review to give them a reason to say no to the opportunity.

4) What it takes to have a good online reputation

Fortunately, there are steps you can take to manage your online reputation so you are not at the mercy of your company’s critics. Start out right by following these three steps:

Step No. 1: Accept the fact of online reviews.

Short of outright slander or libel by the reviewers online, you really don’t have much legal recourse to make the negative postings go away. People have a right to complain, and these days it’s all too easy for unhappy customers to vent their frustrations and share their opinions with the whole world.

When you see a negative review about your company the instinctive reaction is to post a response to set the record straight. I understand the human need to respond, but you have to consider Google’s point of view. Here’s why.
Search engines rank various websites high for a few reasons, one of which is relevant content, especially when that content is updated on a regular basis.

When you post a comment on a website, you are in effect giving it new content. And if you get into a back-and-forth discussion with someone on a review website about your company, Google thinks “Ah, there’s a lot about this company here, so we’ll rank this website high for searches on their company name.”

Now when someone does a search on your company, they are even more likely to see the negative review. You want to avoid that. In fact, you want the websites with negative comments to slip further down the Google rankings so they don’t appear on the first page or two of a search. The next two steps help you with that.

Step No. 2: Focus on getting positive content.

A major part of online reputation management involves pushing the negative websites off of the first page or two of a Google search. How? By posting positive content and getting those pages to rank higher than the negative websites.

You need to direct your marketing or PR department to make online reputation management part of their regular duties, for most of the businesses it has been necessary to use a virtual insurance  service for companies at https://virtualinsuranceservice.com/virtual-bpo-services-for-insurance-agencies.html. That means they should always be looking for, gathering or creating positive content that can be used to continually update your websites. Don’t put everything onto one corporate website. Instead, set up different websites for different purposes.

For example, you can have a website for new distributors, a website about your charitable giving, a website about conferences and meetings, a website for photos and perhaps individual product line websites. This gives you a nice stable of websites that you have control over.

Step No. 3: Push positive websites higher.

In the online world, your reputation is all about who owns the top-ranking results in a search for your company name. You want that space to belong to you—or at least be shared only with websites that have good things to say about you.

If you can do that, then the negative websites will be pushed off the first page of a Google search. And since very few people look past the first page of a search, those negative websites may as well not exist.

The best way to accomplish this is by performing search engine optimization on the positive websites to make them rank higher. Carefully review your websites’ content and the meta title tags to be sure they contain your company name. And most important, you’ll need to create plenty of back links to your positive websites so they are seen as more popular by Google. The magic of ranking higher in Google is relevant content and gathering a substantial number of links from other websites that point to your websites. These links are anchored by your company name.

The goal of getting all the positive websites to rank higher than the negative websites can be a hard one to reach. But considering how important your online reputation is, achieving this goal is well worth the effort. This is not always easy, and it can take many months of steady effort to achieve. Still, consider that the alternative is to let the complaints and negative reviews dominate the search results and trash your online reputation.

Of course, there are even more details to managing your online reputation, but the above steps give you the basic outline of what needs to be done. Just keep in mind that these days your company’s online reputation is one of the most important factors in determining its success.

Contact Me Today

If you’d like a free review of your company’s online reputation please send an email to: don@bigbluerobot.com or call 917-727-5756

Google Dishes Up the Dirt

What is it about Google that it seems to love dishing up the dirt on people and companies? Perform a search on anyone or anything that’s had the slightest bit of controversy in the past, and you’re almost sure to see an article, blog, or review about that in the top search results. You throw links at your site, you optimize their Google My Business listing, you constantly audit and update citations for a correct and consistent NAP; but you still can’t seem to break into those top 3 spots, or into the 3 pack at all! Checkout these local factors that impact your listing.

What Are The Differences Between Google ads and Facebook Ads partner?
Before we look at the various strengths and features of Google AdWords and Facebook Ads, it’s crucial to understand the primary difference between the two ad platforms.

This makes it hard when you’re trying to boost your online reputation by getting more positive sites to rank higher, pushing those negative sites down off the first page. But just when you think you’ve made progress, one of the negative sties will pop back to the upper part of the search results, like a buoy that’s been pushed deep underwater and suddenly released.

You know the kind of sites I’m talking about. The ones dedicated to airing complaints, revealing scams, and generally acting as defenders the First Amendment right to publish whatever you like about someone online, just because you’re feeling ornery about their customer service that day. Whether you are crafting a custom response to each review to really create a concierge support experience or creating templates for your team to use in various support situations, localviking.com/gmb-review-management assure you our tech is going to help take your GMB review management processes to the next level.

Of course, these sites provide a useful public service. The review sites in particular have become invaluable for consumers who want to perform a little due diligence before spending money. The main trouble for some of my clients, and thus for me, is that a negative review or complaint from years ago can still appear in the top ten search results. It’s as if every time you meet someone new they’re told about that lamp you broke when you were five years old — and now they’re not so sure they can trust you around fine furniture.

Any major scandal a company has been involved in will almost certainly come up in the first couple of pages, especially if there was a lot of news coverage. No matter that it was ten years ago, the controversy was overblown, the upper management was replaced, the company was reformed, and all was forgiven. It still tarnishes the reputation in the eyes of anyone performing an online search.

So why does Google seem to have a preference for all these negative sites? Does their algorithm just have a mean streak, as if it were developed by a surly, anti-social, anti-consumerist programmer who delights in seeing successful companies brought down and ridiculed in the eyes of the public?

Well yes, there’s something in their algorithm, but it’s not inherent meanness. It’s just that Google rewards sites that get a lot of traffic. If a page appears in the search results and a lot of people click on the link, the page is likely to rise higher in the results. Then more people see it and click on it, and it moves up another notch. A vicious — or virtuous — cycle, depending on your perspective.

And what kinds of links do people love to click on? Ones that promise to expose the truth about someone or something … that reveal scandals, misconduct, or shocking behavior … that give us the inside scoop on scams and faulty products … and that let us exercise our feeling of moral outrage at some offense, real or imagined. Reading about someone else’s misfortune seems to provide many people with a bit of guilty pleasure. Witness how popular the tabloids have been. As Bette Midler noted, “The worst part of success is to try to find someone who is happy for you.”

So we can’t really blame Google, since its algorithms are just serving up what people want. And if people want dirt, that’s what they’ll get.

Of course, that makes my job more challenging. Trying to get positive pages to rank above the negative sites means working against the forces of human nature, at least the part that derives satisfaction from another’s misfortune. And this is why you can never become complacent in your online reputation management efforts, because those negative sites will keep creeping up the search rankings if you don’t constantly work at making the positive pages rank higher.

How to Rate a Company’s Reputation

If you could have a “Nielsen’s Rating” of reputation, what would it look like? Well, the Harris Poll, owned by Nielsen, has the answer in the form of the Harris Poll Reputation Quotient. This is a yearly poll that gauges the reputations of the largest, well-known companies in the U.S.

Here are the six dimensions they measure: products and services, financial performance, vision and leadership, workplace environment, social responsibility, and emotional appeal. The goal is to help corporate leaders manage their company’s reputation among the general public. But the Harris Poll also publishes the list of the top 100 companies, so you and I can see how they rank.

For example, the top five companies with the best reputations for 2016 are Amazon, Apple, Google, USAA, and The Walt Disney Company. At the bottom of the list was Volkswagen Group, due to the recent scandal involving emissions tests. Comcast came in at a sorry 97 because, well, it’s Comcast.

Now, it’s likely that you’re not a multi-billion dollar company with thousands of employees. So should you care about the Harris Poll Reputation Quotient? Sure, the things they measure can be important when you’re in the public eye. But Acme Car Repair in Any City, USA is not going to show up on Harris Poll’s list of reputation rankings.

It’s just a fact that, if you’re not a well-known company, brand, or celebrity, you’re not likely to have any kind of reputation among the general public. Your customers know you, your suppliers may know you, and a few journalists who cover your industry or area of expertise might also be aware of your existence. But outside of that circle, you just don’t register on anyone’s radar.

And that’s where your online reputation comes in. Because, if someone doesn’t know much about you, they’re going to Google you.

When we talk about online reputation management, we’re not talking about the kinds of things that the Harris Poll looks at. We care about what someone finds when they do search on you or your company. That’s the point where your prospects begin to gain a sense of what your reputation is, mostly by seeing what other people say about you online. And since this could be the first exposure they have to your company, it had better be a good impression.

Curiously, one of the things the Harris Poll evaluates is someone’s “willingness to say something positive, and intent to purchase or recommend your products and services.” But you can easily find that yourself. Just look at the first couple of pages of Google search results and see what people actually say about you. No need to poll them about their intentions. The good, the bad, and the ugly of their recommendations is all right there for you — and everyone else — to see.

So a simple way to rate your reputation is by looking at the number of positive search results on the first page of Google. You’ll get a number like 6 out of 10 positive, or 9 out of 10. The higher the better. You can give it a fancy name like Search Results Online Reputation Quotient, but it comes down to the same thing. Managing your online reputation is then a matter of getting more positive results to show up above the negative results. That can be a challenge, but that’s what we’re here to help you with.

Is the SEO Tail Wagging the Content Dog?

Also posted to Bulldog Reporter: https://www.bulldogreporter.com/is-seos-tail-wagging-the-content-dog/

Much of what we do for Online Reputation Management involves getting pages to show up on the first page of Google search results. That in turn means a lot of search engine optimization (SEO) on the web pages that we want to rank higher. Sometimes, however, it seems we get so focused on ranking in Google that the idea of people actually reading the pages becomes secondary. Local Viking is a Google My Business Management and Posting software developed to help you get the customers interested.

So, is the tail wagging the dog? In other words, have search results become more important than the human-readable content itself? Well, yes and no.

Granted, if you’re a company that sells anything, you still want to provide your customers and prospects with online content that they’ll find helpful, and which will ultimately lead to a sale. But if they don’t find you online, or if your online reputation suffers by having too many negative reviews in the first page of the search results, it may not matter how great your website content is. Your prospects will end up going to a competitor.

Still there are other things you should consider if you sell online. Does your site need ecommerce integration? Is your existing ecommerce platform good enough?

As an online reputation management specialist, my job is to make sure that most of the first page search results for your brand, company, or personal name show you in a good light. That may mean writing press releases or articles, creating websites, or optimizing web pages to show up higher in the search results page. And yes, we want it to be good, readable content. But the main goal is to help the page rank higher.

Of course, the days of keyword stuffing are long gone. Google caught on to that years ago. It’s now considered a “black hat” tactic and isn’t effective. You can’t just cram a bunch of gobbledygook onto a page, or hide a ton of keywords in invisible text, and expect Google to blindly think it’s relevant to a searcher. On the other hand, the writing doesn’t have to be of the highest literary quality. There’s a lot of poorly-written junk out there that ranks well, at least for now.

But that can change, because computers are getting smarter. IBM has created machines that beat a chess master and won at Jeopardy. More recently, Google’s AlphaGo won four out of five games against a champion player of Go, an ancient Chinese board game with simple rules but very complex strategy. That was seen as a huge breakthrough in the development of artificial intelligence about which you can find in-depth knowledge with quotes on https://www.salesforce.com/blog/2019/04/ai-quotes.html.

Couple this with advances in natural language processing, and we’re now rapidly approaching the point where Google will read, understand, and qualify web pages as well as any human can. That means their computers will easily see through any attempts at gaming the algorithms. In fact, their machines will be better than people at gauging the relevancy of web pages in searches. Not only can they look at the content itself, but they have tons of other data about the page, including how many inbound links the page has and how many people have already clicked on the search result. Visit https://stellarseo.com/services/blogger-outreach-service/ for link building service that can generate referral traffic.

One prediction is that we’ll no longer see the occasional release of some disruptive new set of Google algorithms for ranking pages in search results. Rather, Google’s DeepMind team — the ones who brought you AlphaGo — will create an artificial intelligence that will continually learn on its own what is relevant to human searches, and will adjust page rankings accordingly.

Where does this leave us? As always, content is king. So until the machines completely take over, we just have to do our best at continuing to create well-written, informative pages that are relevant and which other highly-ranked websites will want to link to.

How to Manage Your Reputation in a Crisis

Most companies look for online reputation management services because they’ve been hit with negative reviews or comments on hate sites. But what should you do about a full-on crisis, where a major incident has happened related to your company and it’s now all over the press?

First, this is something your PR department and upper management should be prepared for, and a lot of large companies already have plans in place for such a contingency. However, smaller companies can be taken unawares if they’ve never experienced a crisis. They’ve been too busy focusing on growth and serving their customers to think about the unthinkable.

Then it happens. A report on tainted products comes out, or a major accident occurs, or there’s a shooting at one of their facilities, or an executive is under investigation for fraud. And before all the facts come out, the online world is abuzz with speculation, accusations, and fabricated stories. Needless to say, that can cast a cloud over one’s online reputation.

Of course, the worst thing you can do is deny everything and hope the problem will go away. You have to meet it head on and let your customers and the rest of the world know that you’re on top of things. Responding quickly and taking responsibility will go a long way towards deterring speculation, though it won’t stop people who just want to say bad things about you no matter what.

Working with the press and being honest will tend to show your company in a better light than refusing to comment. In any news story that comes up in a search, it’s better to have your side presented than to leave it to the reporter to make something up. People can be quite forgiving if you accept responsibility and tell them the truth. But attempting a cover up will only make it worse.

While the crisis is in full swing, you will probably want to publish press releases with every new development. Press releases usually rank well in Google searches, and they’ll provide a record of events as they unfold, offering readers a chance to see how you responded.

Eventually, one hopes, the problem will be handled, the crisis will blow over, and the press will move on to something else. But the stories and comments will stay online forever. As always, the ultimate goal for managing your online reputation is to make sure that searches related to your company show more positive results than negative ones.

And that’s where we get back to our regularly scheduled program of providing positive content about your company, getting it to rank higher in searches, and pushing the negative content off the first page of search results.

Online Reputation Management Services article in Forbes

Don’t Comment Back: 3 Steps to Managing Your Online Reputation

“So, I Googled myself and read the comments section, thinking I could get some tidbits of what people really think of me. No human being should ever read the comments sections or ever Google one’s self at any time.” – Sandra Bullock

Just like Bullock, many CEOs are often taken aback when they Google their own name or the name of the company they lead. What they find isn’t always flattering. It could be hostile and mean. It might not even be true. But there is it for the world to read. What they read could cost you in lost business or damage your brand’s reputation.

However, there are things you can do to manage your online reputation so you are not at the mercy of your company’s critics. Start by following these three steps:

Step No. 1: Accept the fact of online reviews.
Short of outright slander or libel by the reviewers online, people can say just about anything they want. You really don’t have much legal recourse to make the negative postings go away. People have a right to complain, and online it’s easy for unhappy customers to vent their frustrations and share their opinions with the whole world.

When you see a negative review about your company the instinctive reaction is to post a response to set the record straight. While it’s natural to want to respond and defend yourself, under most cases you should resist.

One way a search engine rank websites high is because it determines the site has relevant content that is fresh, or updated on a regular basis.When you post a comment on a website, you are adding new content. And if you get into a back-and-forth discussion with someone on a review website about your company it can hurt you.

Google will see the website has a lot of information about the company, so they will rank the website high for searches on their company name. When someone does a search on your company, they are even more likely to see the negative review. Your goal is the opposite—you want websites with negative comments to slip further down the Google rankings so they don’t appear on the first page or two of a search. The next two steps help you with that.

Step No. 2: Focus on getting positive content.
A major part of online reputation management is trying to push the negative websites off of the first page or two of a Google search. You can do this by posting positive content and getting those pages to rank higher than the negative websites.

Your marketing or PR department needs to make online reputation management part of their job. They should always be looking for, gathering or creating positive content that can be used to continually update your websites. Don’t put everything onto one corporate website. Instead, set up different websites for different purposes. Or, get interviews or articles about your company on highly respected websites. Social media sites usually rank highly for your company name so make sure to register your company name on all of the major sites.

Step No. 3: Push positive websites higher.
In the online world, your reputation is all about who owns the top-ranking results in a search for your company name. You want those results to be your websites—or at least be shared only with websites that have good things to say about you.

If you can do that, then the negative websites will be pushed off the first page of a Google search. And since very few people look past the first page of a search, those negative websites may as well not exist.

The best way to accomplish this is with search engine optimization to push the positive websites higher. Carefully review your websites’ content and the meta title tags to be sure they contain your company name. The magic of ranking higher in Google is relevant content and gathering a links from other websites that point to your websites.

While it’s not easy to get all of the positive websites to rank higher than the negative websites, it’s worth the effort. Online reputation management is not always easy and it can take many months of steady effort to achieve. Still, consider the alternative of letting complaints and negative reviews dominate the search results and destroy your online reputation.

If you choose to hire an agency or consultant, ask them to show you success they’ve had with other clients. This can be simple such as a before and after screenshot of Google results showing they have made a positive impact.

Of course, there are more details to managing your online reputation than this, but the above steps give you the basic outline of what you need to do. Just keep in mind that your company’s online reputation is one of the most important factors in determining its success.

Rebuilding Wall Street’s Reputation: 7 Key Factors to Focus On

With the national economy taking its time to recover and plenty of recent financial scandals, Wall Street’s reputation has tanked. If Wall Street, banks, and other financial institutions want to rebuild a solid reputation, they’ll need to focus on the 7 distinct perceptions consumers have about them. By addressing each of these areas, Wall Street bankers and stockbrokers can tackle the problem of a poor reputation from several angles.

The 7 key factors Wall Street must address to rebuild reputation are:

  • citizenship

  • financial performance

  • governance

  • innovation

  • leadership

  • products and services

  • workplace environment

Citizenship

Consumers expect companies they do business with and those who hold a lot of power to show good corporate citizenship and social responsibility. Citizenship in this sense is the idea that businesses like those on Wall Street must be actively compliant with the law, monitor and be accountable for their own actions, and have a positive impact on the environment, employees, customers, stakeholders, and the public at large. /

Identity and protocols for the citizen: https://www.application-filing-service.com/socialsecuritycard/replacement-social-security-card-child/

Financial Performance

No one wants to buy from, work for, or invest in a company that isn’t financially stable and making a steady profit. You need to find out more and more, constantly verify and ensure your investments are in good hands. Scandals, embezzlement, debt, gambling, poor investments, sour mergers or acquisitions, and other cash-flow problems all reflect a negative financial performance.

Governance

How a company is run can have a big impact on the company’s reputation. Consumers expect a company to be run efficiently, fairly, and responsibly, with strong values and appropriate policies.

Implementing a better system to punish employees involved in scandals and reward those who live up to the company’s values and mission would go a long way to rebuilding Wall Street’s reputation. So would making processes more efficient, policies more fair, and values and mission statements more in line with the other 6 factors.

Innovation

The most successful companies–which, coincidentally, usually have good reputations–evolve and adapt. They are not afraid to update old products and policies, create new ones to match the times, and otherwise innovate in any way they can to perform better and please stakeholders.

Wall Street has stagnated by doing the same things the same way for years. It’s time for them to get creative and change how they play the game to regain trust and rebuild a strong reputation.

Leadership

Thanks to the internet, consumers expect companies to have visible leaders who are experts in their industries and take a stand on important issues of the day. Wall Street executives should strive to be an influence for good and become thought leaders in smart investing, ethical banking and financial policies, and other relevant topics.

Products & Services

Businesses live or die by the strength and value of their offerings. Wall Street institutions must make sure their products and services actually help customers, solve problems, and are appropriately priced.

Workplace Environment

Although this factor mainly affects employees, it makes a difference in a business’s reputation. Consumers expect businesses they frequent to treat their employees well, and an employee’s assessment of the company is more powerful than a random customer.

Rebuilding Wall Street’s reputation will take a lot of work, but these 7 key factors provide the much-needed guidance to get them on the right track.

 

Contact Info

+1 917-727-5756
don@bigbluerobot.com